Confessions of a Serial Reader – The ones I haven’t started yet

>> Thursday, June 30, 2011


So I have a huge list of series I’m currently reading. I’m current with more than I was a few months ago, and I’m somewhere in the middle of quite a few, but somewhere near the beginning of nearly as many. Then there are the series that I know I want to read and in some cases I even already have the first book but I haven’t even started yet. I’m not even on the road to reading these series. When it comes to this list, I’m still sitting on the porch looking at the road.

These are the series on my list that I hope to be kicking off before too much time goes by and before too many more series join them on the want to but not yet shelf.

Alex McKnight by Steve Hamilton
First book – A Cold Day in Paradise
 A Cold Day in Paradise by Steve Hamilton
I already own this book and have heard many good things about this series


Tattoo Shop Mysteries by Karen E. Olson
First book - The Missing Ink
 The Missing Ink by Karen E. Olson
I have read part of the author’s first series featuring reporter Annie Seymour. I’d like to finish the last couple in that series before I start this one, but every time I run across another positive review of a book from the Tattoo Shop series I’m tempted to go ahead and dive in.


Emma Caldridge by Jamie Freveletti
First Book - Running From the Devil
 Running From the Devil by Jamie Freveletti
This one I bought last year on the recommendation of Jenn at Jenn’s Bookshelves. The main character is a chemist and a runner so I thought The Hubster might like it since he’s – yep, you guessed it – a chemist and a runner. He liked the first book and I’m planning on using it for one of my books for the What’s in a Name Challenge so I plan on reading it at the very least, before the end of the year.


Ellie Hatcher by Alafiar Burke
First Book - Dead Connection
 Dead Connection by Alafair Burke
This series is on my list thanks to Jen at Jen’s Book Thoughts. I’m currently reading the author’s newly releases standalone suspense novel and enjoying her style quite a bit. It’s built up my anticipation for getting into this series.


Holmes on the Range by Steve Hockensmith
First Book - Holmes on the Range
 Holmes on the Range by Steve Hockensmith
I read and enjoyed the author’s darkly humorous holiday collection of short stories and have had several people I trust recommend this series so I already own the first one. I also have his collection of short stories featuring characters from this series. I’m thinking of starting to read some of those for my Short Story Mondays before starting this book.


Pendergast by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child
First Book - The Relic
 The Relic by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child
This is one of those series that somehow slipped past my radar and I’ve never read it. I did read their recent first in a new series book (Gideon’s Sword) and enjoyed it so added the series to my list.


Percy Jackson and the Olympians by Rick Riordan
First Book - The Lightning Thief
 The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
I bought the first book a while ago, but had set it aside until I finished listening to the audio versions of the Harry Potter series as a re-read. I’m seriously considering packing this next month as one of my vacation books.


What about you? Have you read any of these series? What are your thoughts on these? Do you have any recommendations about which one I should start first? Do you have any series that you want to read but haven’t actually started yet?

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Wordless Wednesday #91

>> Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Taking flight
Cannon Beach, Oregon




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Short Story Monday - Anyone Can Die by James Le Pore

>> Monday, June 27, 2011


Anyone Can Die by James Le Pore
="Anyone

Genre: Short Stories
Publisher: The Story Plant
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 46
Source: Copy provided by the author

The Short Version:
Three short stories providing background for the main characters of the author’s first suspense novel A World I Never Made.

Why I Read It:
I’ve enjoyed two of James Le Pore’s books and when he offered to send me this short story collection I quickly said yes.

The Book:
The book (really more of a booklet at 46 pages) contains three short stories that provide some background for three main characters of the novel A World I Never Made.

In the introduction the author explains that in editing the novel, he found it necessary to edit out some of the backstories of the characters in order to preserve the pacing of the the book. He later used some of that material to write these shot stories as a companion piece to the novel.

Till Death Do Us Part
Pat Nolan and his bride discover surprising things about themselves and each other when confronted with a dangerous situation on their honeymoon. While exploring New Mexico they stop to check out a hot spring they’d heard about, but newlyweds Pat and Lorrie Dolan encounter trouble with some locals. Even though they’re still learning about each other they are forced into a situation that reveals truths about them both individually and as a couple.

God’s Warriors
Megan Nolan is on her own and living in Paris. She has a rather cynical attitude about her current relationship and lover, but is she really that heartless? Scenes from a series of related incidents reveal that Megan has an unexpected soft side to go along with her tough exterior and outlook on life.

Max
FBI agent Max French takes a break from the wrap up of a complex case to get back to the Seattle area of his childhood for the funeral of a person who had been instrumental in his life. The flashbacks to events of many years ago

My Thoughts:

These stories can be read in isolation from the novel quite easily. On their own they are stories that have some suspense and are about pivotal moments in the characters lives. To read them as a companion piece to A World I Never Made, however adds some interesting background and additional thoughts about the characters.

In the introduction to this book(let), Le Pore says that the stories are something that can be read separate from the novel as well as before or after. I liked them as a worthwhile extension of it even though it’s been nearly two years since I read it.


3.5 stars Rating 3.5/5


Short Story Mondays is hosted by John at The Book Mine Set.

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Weekend Update: June 25, 2011

>> Saturday, June 25, 2011

Weekend Update


This week:
I finished Ranger by Ace Atkins. It’s a promising beginning to a new series and I’m eagerly anticipating the next book. I started Long Gone by Alafair Burke but haven’t had much reading time.

As for audio, I finished listening to Mostly Harmless by Douglas Adams. The last of the series that he wrote and it was just as much fun as the others. There’s a follow up book written by someone else, but it doesn’t seem to be available on audio.

I started listening to Bury Your Dead by Louise Penny. I love listening to Ralph Cosham read this series.


Other than books and reading:
Part of the reason I haven’t had much reading time is that I’ve been knitting a lot. I hope to finish up the baby afghan in the next few days and have photos next week.

I did finally put together some of the photos from our trip to Cannon Beach last month. The rest can be seen over at Out on a Whim.

Cannon Beach



Added to my TBR List (To Be Read) this week:

Inside Scientology by Janet Reitman
 Inside Scientology by Janet Reitman

I saw this one mentioned on Twitter this week and it caught my attention. Reitman wrote an article about the secretive religion for Rolling Stone in 2006 and has expanded and continued her research for this book.


Purchased this week:

I didn’t buy anything this week.


No changes in the Library stack this week will be diving headfirst into these once the afghan is done:

library


Have a great weekend!

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Audiobook – Mostly Harmless by Douglas Adams

>> Friday, June 24, 2011

Mostly Harmless by Douglas Adams
Mostly Harmless by Douglas Adams


Genre: Science Fiction / Humor
Publisher: Random House Audio
Publication Date: This edition 2006, originally published 1992
Read by: Martin Freeman
Source: Library

The Short Version:
The craziness continues as Arthur Dent and Ford Prefect continue their travels around the galaxy separately and together catching up with old friends here and there as well as some surprise newcomers.

Why I Read It:
I have so thoroughly enjoyed listening to this series that I simply had to continue.

The Book:
Described on the cover of the first edition of the book as “The fifth book in the increasingly inaccurately named Hitchhikers Trilogy” this continues the story of Arthur Dent, his friend Ford Prefect (from somewhere near Betelgeuse) and Tricia McMillan (a former Mathemetician and Astrophysicist turned TV reporter).

After Arthur’s love disappears, he ends up on a remote planet making sandwiches. His now peaceful life is once again interrupted by an unexpected and surprising visitor.

Ford has found the latest location of the headquarters of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the galaxy to discover it’s been taken over by a huge corporation and that a new version of the Guide has him quite suspicious.

Tricia is working as a TV anchorwoman seeking the great story. When an unexpected trip to the newly discovered tenth plan “Rupert” (clearly the book was written before Pluto was demoted) comes along she just might have that story . . . or not.

The book alternates between the storylines of all three of these characters separately and eventually brings everyone together in a twist of the space-time continuum that only Douglas Adams could come up with.


My Thoughts:
This is such a fun series. I often found myself all alone in the car, laughing out loud as I listened. The craziness of the story is not for everyone, but I encourage you to give the audio versions of the series a try. The first one, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy was read by Stephen Fry and was simply fun. The rest have been read by Martin Freeman, who played Arthur Dent in the movie version.

Don’t expect logical timelines or identifiable locations or species, but just sit back and enjoy the fun. The multiple parallel dimensions and their occasional intersections will make your head spin. At the same time the wit and charm will make you smile. When Ford was at the headquarters of The Hitchhiker’s Guide the barbed humor directed at big corporations was fabulous.

Yes there are ridiculous coincidences and Ford Prefect seems to be luckier than any creature ever to exist, but when there are also flying robots and aliens who have lost their collective memories and can’t quite remember their mission, who cares?

Stephen Fry did an amazing job reading the first book, but the change to Martin Freeman as reader for the rest of the series has not been a problematic change at all. He is just as wonderful, Grab your towel and enjoy.


Rating 4/5



SoundBytes is a weekly roundup of audio book reviews hosted by Jen at Devourer of Books.

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Wordless Wednesday #90

>> Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Old Man's Beard Lichen on tree
Hagg Lake, Oregon


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The Ranger by Ace Atkins

>> Tuesday, June 21, 2011

The Ranger by Ace Atkins
The Ranger by Ace Atkins

Genre: Suspense, Crime Fiction
Series: #1 in the Quinn Colson series
Publisher: G.P. Putnam’s Sons
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 334
Source: Copy provided by publisher



The Short Version:
Army Ranger Quinn Colson returns to his hometown in Northern Mississippi for his uncle’s funeral, but discovers both unanswered questions and plenty of trouble brewing in town.

Why I Read It:
I’d read a couple of Atkins earlier books from the Nick Travers series and liked their noir-ish feel. When I heard that this newest book from him was the first in a new series I didn’t hesitate to say yes when I had the opportunity to read it.

The Book:
Quinn Colson returns home to small town Northern Mississipi for his uncle’s funeral. His uncle was the local Sheriff and for Quinn he was a father figure taking the place of Quinn’s own absent father. When his old friend Lillie (who is now a Sheriff’s deputy) shares her suspicions about the death, Quinn starts asking questions. Soon he discovers that his hometown is not only struggling with economic troubles, but is also home to corrupt politicians, meth labs and a crazy separatist group leader training his gang for a race war.

In this mix of old friends and new enemies, Quinn sets out to save the family land from a corrupt politician and find out the truth about his uncle’s death.


My Thoughts:
I’m already eagerly anticipating the next book in this series. Quinn Colson is a great character. His career as an Army Ranger is at a crossroads and he’s not happy to be out of the action and he’s now an instructor after being in the thick of things in Afghanistan. The training comes in handy when he goes up against a great cast of bad guys in his hometown.

This is a wonderful blend of old fashioned western and contemporary mystery that’s thick with Southern atmosphere. Quinn is a hero in the mode of Jack Reacher but with a hometown and roots. The secondary characters are great. I spent half the book reading with my fingers crossed and thinking “please don’t kill off ____” because I want that character to be back in the next book.

Lillie Virgil is the female deputy with heart and Boom Kimbrough is a National Guard vet back home minus his right arm thanks to an IED in Iraq. Quinn’s ex-girlfriend who is now married to his high school friend is still a bit more entwined in Quinn’s life than he’d like. Lena, the pregnant teen brings out the protector in Quinn and I found myself rooting for her to make the right choices as the story went on. All of these characters are interesting and round out Quinn’s past and present in a way that keeps him the central character without being a total loner.

Atkins has created a hero I like and in this book set him against a group of villains that keep the story changing direction and moving along. It’s fast paced but at the same time is establishing Quinn and his background to set up for a series that I will be reading. I’m going to pass this one on to The Hubster because this is a series that we’ll both enjoy.


Rating 4/5

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Short Story Monday – The Idol House of Astarte by Agatha Christie

>> Monday, June 20, 2011



After reading The Tuesday Night Club a couple of weeks ago I bought the collection that contains that short story. I enjoyed the introduction of Miss Marple and wanted to read more about the group and their mystery solving meetings.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-oDH3gB4DQbI/Tf7FMB4T96I/AAAAAAAAHDo/sPTj8eIjnmM/s400/Thirteen%2BProblems.jpg

The Idol House of Astarte by Agatha Christie
Part of a collection published as The Thirteen Problems originally published 1932
Published: originally published 1932 this edition published 2004 by Harper Collins

This story continues the meetings of the Tuesday Night Club and reads more like a continuation in that the main characters are not reintroduced. It might be confusing to read this one (and I’m guessing the rest of the Tuesday Night Club stories) without having read the first.

This time around the clergyman, Dr. Pender presents the mystery. He tells of a house party he attended with several other people. An old friend of his had recently purchased the house and he was particularly proud of a grove on the grounds he liked to believe was an ancient temple and site of mysterious rituals. One of the guests, a beautiful socialite, proposes a moonlight party at the temple. When one of the guests mysteriously dies the authorities have no way to determine how he was killed.

The members of the club suggest their theories and to no surprise, Miss Marple is the one who figures it out.

I recommend reading the first story before this one, but with that background it’s another fun story and I’ll be reading the rest in this collection.



Short Story Mondays is hosted by John at The Book Mine Set.

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Weekend Update: June 18, 2011

>> Saturday, June 18, 2011

Weekend Update


This week:
I finished The Two Deaths of Daniel Hayes by Marcus Sakey. It was a fun thrill ride as expected. We took a road trip to Southern Oregon last weekend and listened to The Wordy Shipmates by Sarah Vowell. Her books are such interesting and fun audiobooks. They’re perfect for road trip listening because of the way she intersperses historical information with wry asides and sarcastic comments.

I started reading The Ranger by Ace Atkins. I’ve read the first two of his Nick Travers series but this new one is the first of a new planned series.

As for audio, I’m still listening to Mostly Harmless by Douglas Adams. If you’ve read the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy series you really should consider the audio versions as a re-reading option and if you haven’t read them, you should definitely go the audio route.


Other than books and reading:
We took last Friday off work and made it a long weekend of a trip to Southern Oregon. The main reasons were to see a couple of plays at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and to do some wine tasting and ‘wine cellar’* restocking.
*the space under the stairs

I took a bunch of pictures so you'll be seeing some of those her for future Wordless Wednesdays and I'll probably post a few over at Out on a Whim.

Macgregors Books Yreka

Macgregors Books YrekaOur trip included a venture into California and yes, that was primarily so we could both play Qrank on our iphones to get the badge for playing in California. I did make a good excuse to go to Yreka for lunch and walk around a bit in the historic part of town. We found a cute little book, etc shop called MacGregor's Gifts, Grogg & Book Emporium that was a bit of a treasure trove.

Macgregors Books Yreka



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Added to my TBR List (To Be Read) this week:

Vanished by Joseph Finder
 Vanished by Joseph Finder

I read a short story featuring the main character of this series (Nick Heller) and liked it so much that I need to read the series. This is the first book. There is a second book in the series (Buried Secrets) due out this week.


Shoot to Thrill by P.J. Tracy
 Shoot to Thrill by P.J. Tracy

I left off at the fourth book in this series and it dropped off my radar. A random mention on Twitter this week prompted me to add this to my Library wish list to read sometime soon.

The Story of Beautiful Girl by Rachel Simon
 The Story of Beautiful Girl by Rachel Simon

I was already considering this one but Jenn at Jenn’s Bookshelves mentioned this week how much she was enjoying the audio verson so I’ll be getting that one from the library.


The Murder of the Century: The Gilded Age Crime That Scandalized a City and Sparked the Tabloid Wars by Paul Collins
 Murder of the Century by Paul Collins


I found out about this one from the local newspaper’s Sunday book section. They did a nice write up because the author has local ties. It sounds quite interesting.

The Reservoir by John Milliken Thompson
 Murder of the Century by Paul Collins

Between the gorgeous cover and the description of a Southern mystery based on a true story from 1885 Virginia, it was inevitable for this one to land on my list.


Purchased this week:

Buried by Mark Billingham
 Buried by Mark Billingham

Trust No One by Gregg Hurwitz
 Trust No One by Gregg Hurwitz


No major changes in the Library stack this week:

library


Have a great weekend!

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Audiobook – The Wordy Shipmates by Sarah Vowell

>> Friday, June 17, 2011

The Wordy Shipmates by Sarah Vowell
The Wordy Shipmates by Sarah Vowell


Genre: Non-Fiction
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Publication Date: 2008
Read by: Sarah Vowell
Source: Library

The Short Version:
Highly entertaining combination of historical facts, social commentary and humorous asides as Sarah Vowell explores the history of the Puritans who settled New England.

Why I Read It:
We enjoyed listening to Sara Vowell’s Assassination Vacation on our last road trip to Southern Oregon that we decided to get more of her books on audio. This was next up and we took another trip to Southern Oregon last weekend.

The Book:
This book is so hard for me to try to summarize that I’m going to use the publisher’s description.

Sarah Vowell explores the Puritans and their journey to America in The Wordy Shipmates. Even today, America views itself as a Puritan nation, but Vowell investigates what that means -- and what it should mean. What was this great political enterprise all about? Who were these people who are considered the philosophical, spiritual, and moral ancestors of our nation? The people she finds are highly literate, deeply principled, and surprisingly feisty. Their story is filled with pamphlet feuds, witty courtroom dramas, and bloody vengeance. Along the way she asks:
•Was Massachusetts Bay Colony governor John Winthrop a communitarian, a Christ-like Christian, or conformity's tyrannical enforcer? Answer: Yes!
•Was Rhode Island's architect, Roger Williams, America's founding freak or the father of the First Amendment? Same difference.
•What was the Puritans' pet name for the Pope? The Great Whore of Babylon.
Sarah Vowell's special brand of armchair history makes the bizarre and esoteric fascinatingly relevant and fun. She takes us from the modern-day reenactment of an Indian massacre to the Mohegan Sun casino, from old-timey Puritan poetry, to a Mayflower-themed waterslide. The Wordy Shipmates is rich in historical fact, humorous insight, and social commentary by one of America's most celebrated voices. Thou shalt enjoy it.

My Thoughts:
I’ll admit that although this was informative, entertaining and enjoyable and I liked it a lot, but not quite as much as Assassination Vacation. I would probably think differently if I had listened to this one before Assassination Vacation.

Sarah Vowell once again mixes history, social commentary, humor, sarcasm and just plain fun into a unique mix. This time around she takes a look at the Puritan settlement of New England. She notes early on that what she’s not talking about is Plymouth and the Mayflower and she’s also not talking about the Salem witch trials. As she points out these two places and small time periods are often the only part of the early New England that we study in school before jumping straight to the pre-revolutionary period. She’s right. Much of what she talks about in this book is information with which I was only marginally familiar.

She stars with the speech made by Joseph Cotton before the ship carrying the first group of settlers associated with the Massachusetts Bay company leaves England. She spends some time on John Winthrop’s sermon “A Model of Christian Charity. It’s ‘City on a hill’ imagery is strong and until Vowell talks about how much modern politicians have used that image, I had not realized how much I’ve heard it.

I enjoyed her thoughts on Roger Williams who was basically banished from Massachusetts and went on to establish Rhode Island. He was definitely at odds with the leaders of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and had some trouble keeping his mouth shut. On the other hand his thoughts on religious tolerance are something we all need to be talking more about even today.

Vowell’s voice and delivery are most definitely unique and take some getting used to, but also are a large part of why her audio books are such fun.

I will admit I love every time she ventures off into a story about her nephew Owen. They’re always wonderful.


Rating 4/5

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Wordless Wednesday #89

>> Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Leaning on each other
Rural Washington County, Oregon


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The Two Deaths of Daniel Hayes by Marcus Sakey

>> Tuesday, June 14, 2011


The Two Deaths of Daniel Hayes by Marcus Sakey

Genre: Mystery, Thriller
Publisher: Dutton
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 396
Source: Copy provided by publisher through NetGalley

The Short Version:
A man wakes up on a Maine beach with no clue who he is and within hours has some clues to his identity, but no real memory and has managed to figure out only that he’s on the run from the police.

Why I Read It:
The short answer to why I read it is because Marcus Sakey wrote it. Both The Hubster and I have read and enjoyed his earlier books so it was easy for me to jump at the opportunity to read this new one.

The Book
A man wakes up on a beach in Maine. He has no idea who he is, where he came from or why he is there. There is no one in sight and the only clue is a car parked nearby. The car contains clothes that fit him, a registration in the name of Daniel Hayes, a gun and some cash. Unsure, but presuming he is Daniel Hayes the man sets out to find out if this is true and why he’s here.

When he stops at a motel, he looks in the mirror and has absolutely no recognition of the face he sees. He turns on the TV and finds familiarity in a show with a woman who seems familiar. Could it be simply that he was a fan of the show or is there some sort of connection he doesn’t yet understand.

The next thing he knows is that the police are pounding on his motel room door with guns drawn, looking for Daniel Hayes.

Fearful of who he may be and why the police are after him, the man sets out for Malibu in search of more answers than anyone should have questions.

My Thoughts:
It’s tough for me to talk about this book without giving away plot that I feel strongly you should not know if you plan to read it. It’s a spiral of amnesia, memory, love, mistrust and betrayal that is best experienced without knowing too much ahead of time. This is why the summary above is limited to events of the early pages.

What a thrill ride of a book. From the opening sentence to the end of the book, the reader discovers the truths and lies right along with Daniel Hayes. The sense of uncertainty he feels as he discovers his own history is extremely well done. I sometimes wondered if the things he began to remember might turn out to be remnants from an old television script. I kept changing my mind about whether or not he could trust the people he was choosing to trust. I certainly never felt sure that he was being told the truth.

As the story progresses the danger is palpable. The twists and turns come fast and often. Just about every time I thought I had everything figured out I’d get whacked upside the head with a surprise. That’s what made this such a suspenseful and entertaining read. The bad guy is one of the more deliciously nasty villains I’ve read in a long time. The good guys can never be wholly trusted.

I did enjoy the part where one of my favorite bloggers Jen from Jen’s Book Thoughts appears as a character in the book. She’s a defense attorney with a reputation as someone to be feared. It was a lot of fun to run across the name of a friend among the characters.

I’ve enjoyed every Marcus Sakey book I’ve read, but at the same time every one has been better than the previous. I’ll be anxiously awaiting his next book, but I’m happy that in the meantime I still have his previous book, The Amateurs to read.

I definitely recommend this one and will be purchasing a copy for The Hubster to read.

Rating 4.5/5

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Short Story Monday – Plan B by Joseph Finder

>> Monday, June 13, 2011



I’ve never read anything by Joseph Finder but since this short story is available to read online or to download for an eReader it made for a perfect opportunity to give a new to me author a try.

Plan B by Joseph Finder

Plan B by Joseph Finder
Available online or for download: You can read or download at Joseph Finder’s website
Published: 2011 by St. Martin’s Press


Nick Heller is a private ‘contractor’ who is hired by a Ukranian businessman living in London. His job is to rescue a 15 year old girl who is being held in the well secured Barcelona estate. Nick and his colleague Benito have a plan to get in and back out with the girl. The trick is to pull it off without setting off the alarms or getting stopped by the security guards. At least that’s Plan A.

This story reads like an episode of a TV action show and I recommend it to fans of action and suspense books. As I said, I’ve never read any of Joseph Finder’s books but after reading this story I’m adding his two Nick Heller books to my TBR list.

Even though it’s a short story, there are plenty of twists and lots of action. It also includes an excerpt from the new Nick Heller book but I haven’t read that because I still need to read the first one.



Short Story Mondays is hosted by John at The Book Mine Set.

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Weekend Update: June 11, 2011

>> Saturday, June 11, 2011



This week:
I’ve been reading The Two Deaths of Daniel Hayes by Marcus Sakey and have been truly frustrated with my lack of reading time this week. It’s a book I would have loved to sit down with and immerse myself in. Even in the bits and pieces of reading time I’ve had it’s a thrilling and suspenseful book.

I introduced myself to both Agatha Christie and Miss Jane Marple by reading the first short story in which Miss Marple is introduced. I read that one out of a library book, but decided I needed to own the collection it came from so I could read more.

As for audio, I’m listening to Mostly Harmless by Douglas Adams and as always he’s got me laughing out loud to myself as I drive around town.


Other than books and reading:
Last weekend was our major spring yard cleanup project – we were insane and did the whole thing in one day last Saturday so on Sunday we were pretty much lumps. It’s nice to have it done and the yard looks great. The new addition of the pink flamingos I’ve wanted for years tops it off perfectly.
Flamingos


Added to my TBR List (To Be Read) this week:

Miss Peregrines Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

I happened across a Twitter conversation about this one earlier this week and a link to the book trailer led me to look further. It just sounds so creepily interesting. I rarely watch book trailers, but for some reason I did this time and after watching this I have to read the book.




Purchased this week:

The Thirteen Problems by Agatha Christie


After reading the first of the Tuesday Night Club stories that introduced Miss Jane Marple I decided I wanted to buy this. Having short stories available to read on my phone is perfect for those times I have just a few unexpected minutes and no book. It’s a great way for me to read the rest of this collection.

These next purchases are all because Unbridled Books ran a promotion this week that Publisher’s Weekly explains so much better than I could:

Unbridled Books has never shied away from taking the initiative when it comes to marketing their authors and books in unconventional ways. This time, the press is partnering with the American Booksellers Association to promote the organization’s IndieCommerce program. For three days -- June 9, 10, 11 -- Unbridled is offering 25 of its titles in e-book format for 25 cents exclusively through the approximately 250 independent bookstores that are set up to sell Google e-books through the ABA’s platform.

I like being able to purchase e-books from indie stores and wish it was something I could do through all the indies I know of. Anyway – these are the Unbridled titles that have been on my TBR list that I purchased this week from my primary local indie which happens to be Powells.

Captivity by Deborah Noyes


The Pirate's Daughter by Margaret Cezair-Thompson


The Singer's Gun by Emily St. John Mandel


Stranger Here Below by Joyce Hinnefeld


Taroko Gorge by Jacob Ritari



This Week’s Library Stack is exactly the same as last weeks because of my lack of reading time::



Have a great weekend!

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